FWF Celebrity Workshop: Jonathan Maberry

I am excited to share that the 2019 Florida Writers Foundation Celebrity Workshop is hosting Jonathan Maberry.

Jonathan Maberry is a New York Times bestselling author, 5-time Bram Stoker Award-winner, and comic book writer. His vampire apocalypse book series, V-WARS, is in production as a Netflix original series and will debut in early 2019. He writes in multiple genres including suspense, thriller, horror, science fiction, fantasy, and action; and he writes for adults, teens and middle grade. Find him online at www.jonathanmaberry.com.

You can register for the FWF Celebrity Workshop here.

The Florida Writers Foundation is the charitable sister organization of the Florida Writers Association.

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Upcoming – Spooky Empire Creators Track

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I will be appearing as part of the Creators Track at Spooky Empire in Orlando, Florida, USA, on October 26-28, 2018.  Spooky Empire Ultimate Horror Weekend is one of the largest horror conventions in the nation, and this year’s convention has a huge line up of celebrity guests, horror creators, a film festival, live performances, and a tattoo festival.

This year’s Creators Track focuses on horror writers and includes panels, seminars, and signings. Come see me at Cult of Terror, Women in Horror, and Writing is Hard, But We Love It.  I’ll also be signing The Dark and Stormy Night, a blind round robin horror story.

Want more information on the Creators Track? I wrote about last year’s panels for The Midnight Society.

Can’t wait to see you there!

VICTORIANATIONS

Woo hoo! Blink Fly is a Finalist!

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Fed up with her cabin mates, a girl hikes under the Texas sun and meets the fly of her darkest dreams.

I’m excited to announce that my story, “Blink Fly,” is a finalist in the published flash fiction category of the Royal Palm Literary Awards.

The Royal Palm Literary Awards are the Florida Writers Association annual writing competition.  I’ve been a member of FWA for several years, and I’m honored that my story has been recognized by my local writing community.

Awards will be given on October 20, 2018, at the FWA conference banquet.

“Blink Fly” was published as part of the Summer of Screams Writer and Artist Showcase, a compilation of dark fiction and artwork set in summer camp.

Spooky Empire Refugees – 20 Days until Halloween

If you follow me on Twitter, you may have seen my posts about #SpookyEmpireRefugees.  It was heart-breaking, then heart-warming, and overall an incredible event for Central Florida’s horror community.

I had spooky plans for the first weekend in October.  Somehow, The Addams Family musical, Halloween Horror Nights, and Spooky Empire all came together at the same time.  I was especially excited about the horror writing panels at Spooky Empire.  Then Hurricane Matthew happened.

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Neighbors stocked up on ice, and we bought a clown.

If you’ve been through a hurricane or other huge storm that you can plan for, you know how the days beforehand are a mix of excitement and impending doom.  You prepare for the weather and losing power.  You follow work and school closures.  You check on the folks in the path of the storm.  You wait, and you hope it isn’t as bad as it could be.

By Thursday, it became clear that things could become pretty bad for Orlando and all of Florida’s east coast.  The theme parks wisely shut down.  And Spooky Empire had to cancel.

This article describes how the horror community rallied in the wake of the storm, pulling together to support the people who organized Spooky Empire, the numerous vendors who were missing the event, and the horror fans who desperately wanted their spooky weekend.

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Horror writers, artists, and vendors packed Gods & Monsters comic store.  The Bloody Jug Band wailed.  There were amazing cosplayers.

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The Spooky Empire Refugees event happened because of the amazing folks at Coffee Shop of Horrors.  They make horror-themed coffees (and teas, candies, and soaps), roasted locally and to order.  Everything there is delicious, and the small bags make excellent Halloween gifts.

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You need something to keep your warm in the autumn chill.  May I also suggest Tribal Screams Roasted Chestnut and Bubba Spiced Bourbon?

 

 

 

 

A Monstrous Love – 4 Days Until Halloween

In the movie Crimson Peak, Lucille Sharpe (the dark sister who holds the keys to the family manse) tells the gothic heroine, “It is a monstrous love. And it makes monsters of us all.”  Her version of love is menacing and possibly mad, as the best monsters are.

My favorite monsters pursue their victims with a deliberate and threatening drive.  In a presentation at the Florida Writers Conference, Sidney Williams posited that a monster is only frightening until you see it, and I think this is true.  You know it is there, that it will come, that it is hunting the others. The anticipation is suffocating. You squint into the darkness trying to see if you can make out its silhouette.  You wait behind the door with the gothic heroine, the original final girl, listening hard for its approach, desperately wanting to bolt, trying to hold your breath so you won’t be heard.

You want the monster to find her, so the final girl can face it and survive.  But the monster is never more threatening than right before that breathless moment.

Quiet Horror – 12 Days Until Halloween

I grew up reading Edgar Allan Poe and H.P. Lovecraft, and I still adore them. Some day their language is overblown, but I love how their lavish descriptions overwhelm me. Their stories are more horrifying for how they make me feel crushed beneath moldering walls and surrounded by alien angles.  Something monstrous is usually threatening to overtake their narrators, and I hold my breath waiting for it to come.

When I see old buildings, their windows covered, my mind runs with the possibilities of what could be lurking behind them.  The buildings may be abandoned, but somehow they don’t seem empty.  I want to see the curtain twitch.  I want to see a shadow move behind them.

One of the presentations by Sidney Williams at the Florida Writers Conference was on quiet horror, those stories with a feeling of creeping terror.  It’s the form of horror fiction that I love to write (and read).  I want a reader to sense something is off, something wrong is happening. They’ll sense something is waiting for them to come closer, but they won’t be able to identify it in time. The unknown, the inability to escape, will make it even scarier.

Sunday Chores, Again – 13 Days Until Halloween

Two of my favorite sessions at the Florida Writers Conference were today.  I spent the morning delving in to how characters respond to supernatural elements and geeking out over writing horror so it fills a reader with dread.

But there was time this afternoon to check off a Halloween task: pumpkins!  They were so bright, so huge, and in all different shapes.  These will be very good jack-o-lanterns.

October Is For Writing Conferences – 15 Days Until Halloween

It is an amazing feeling to write a scene, even a sentence, that gives you a little thrill.  I enjoy writing spooky stuff, and those thrills come when I feel like I’ve written a scene that is particularly gruesome or I’ve managed to capture a character’s reaction to the horrific thing that is happening.  It makes me pull away from the keyboard and make delighted spirit fingers.

If I describe my excitement to someone who doesn’t write, they often look puzzled.  From the outside, I’m just someone sitting at a computer who suddenly gets giddy for no apparent reason.  If only they could see the events that are happening in my head!

That’s one of the important things about writing conferences for me.  When I talk about that feeling to other writers, they get it.  They get excited along with me, and they share their experiences with writing a delicious scene that defined their character or the make-believe world they are creating.

The motto of the Florida Writers Association is “Writers Helping Writers,” and the  Florida Writers Conference is this weekend.  The panels cover topics from the craft of writing and the writing life, to the business of representation and publishing.  One my favorite events is the daily Genre Breakfast.  If you come to the conference, come sit with me and the other speculative fiction writers, and we’ll talk about how to make our fantastic worlds seem “real.”

The Power Of Writing Conferences – Recap Of #FHBF2015

I’m very glad I went to the Florida Heritage Book Festival and Writing Conference this year. I gained insight into my writing and new ideas for telling stories.

Thursday was a writing critique session. Participants submitted their first 10 pages of a work in early September, and we brought written comments for each other to the session. There were nine of us and the session leader, and most of them were memoir writers. Just three of us, myself included, had submitted fiction. Any reticence I had about not working with fiction writers dissipated when I read my group’s submissions. My fictional characters work through conflicts, interact with other characters with differing levels of success, and (hopefully) grow through their story. Memoirs are stories of the writer doing just that, sometimes in heart wrenchingly relatable ways.

I was lucky to work with such a diverse group. Our ages ranged from a high senior to a couple of self-labeled “old guys.” We came from different parts of the United States and overseas. We had many different careers and life experiences. The alchemy of the group worked. We had commonality in our backgrounds even if the particulars were different. We took different things from each others’ stories, interpreted characters’ motivations differently, and from that we discussed how these nuances made the stories more complex.

We need diverse stories because it opens us up to different experiences. But, diverse stories also show us as writers how we can touch readers in fundamental ways, even if their backgrounds are different from those described in the storyIMG_9407.

Friday was the writing conference, and something serendipitous happened during
my first session. Elizabeth Sims, a fiction and non-fiction writer, lead an exercise in a writing method she calls Stormwriting. I’ve used her method before, and darned if a horror story idea didn’t pop up. It was so distracting, I found a gorgeous corner bench to chase down the gruesome little idea through the following session. Now I just need to figure out if the main character is going to get past her little problem, or it will just get worse.

If you live near Florida, I recommend you attend the Florida Heritage Book Festival and Writing Conference next year.  And join a writing critique session if you are working on something – the feedback will show aspects of your story to you in new and different ways.